browser icon
You are using an insecure version of your web browser. Please update your browser!
Using an outdated browser makes your computer unsafe. For a safer, faster, more enjoyable user experience, please update your browser today or try a newer browser.

The Matterhorn: Choosing Fantasy or the Future

Posted by on August 9, 2010

 



Tomorrowland. A vista into a world of wondrous ideas, signifying man’s achievement. A step into the future, with predictions of constructive things to come.” (from Walt Disney’s dedication speech)

When the general outlook of people is positive, science fiction is popular. When that outlook is negative, fantasy is popular. Looking to the future—even a fictional one—means embracing change. Looking to fantasy means clinging to the way you perceive things to be, and being unwilling to change.

John Maxwell said, “People change when they hurt enough that they have to, when they learn enough that they want to, and when they receive enough that they are able to.” Are you choosing to look to embrace change or hold tightly to fantasy, which provides an illusion of stability?

The Matterhorn stands at that point of decision. Hope and looking to the future, or retreat into the perceived safety of fantasy. It is the only current ride that straddles two lands (There were four Autopias, but each was an entirely separate attraction, so that doesn’t count). Interestingly, the only other ride to exist in two lands covered the same two lands—the Magic Skyway.





On the Fantasyland side of the Matterhorn, there are a lot of curves. Twisting and turning back on itself. But very few surprises. Only a couple of small dips, and no real drops. It’s the smoothest and feels slowest of the two tracks.
The Tomorrowland side has fewer curves, but more dips, and even a couple of respectable drops. It’s the rougher of the two tracks, and it feels faster (though there is really no difference in speed on average).

In much the same way, the choices between fantasy and the future are the choice between a perception of safety and security versus a perception of greater risk. But the truth is, both are risky in their own way. Clinging to perceived safety means not stepping out, not growing, not progressing and becoming the person God made you to be. It means a life half-lived. Moving into the future means risking change, even possible failure. But it also means growing into the person God designed you to be. A life fully lived.

Read Hebrews 11 and notice how often faith is connected with action verbs.

  • “By faith Abel offered God a better sacrifice…”
  • “By faith Noah … built an ark …”
  • “By faith Abraham, when called to go to a place he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going.”
  • “And what more shall I say? I do not have time to tell about Gideon, Barak, Samson, Jephthah, David, Samuel and the prophets, who through faith conquered kingdoms, administered justice, and gained what was promised; who shut the mouths of lions, quenched the fury of the flames, and escaped the edge of the sword; whose weakness was turned to strength; and who became powerful in battle and routed foreign armies. Women received back their dead, raised to life again. Others were tortured and refused to be released, so that they might gain a better resurrection. Some faced jeers and flogging, while still others were chained and put in prison. They were stoned; they were sawed in two; they were put to death by the sword. They went about in sheepskins and goatskins, destitute, persecuted and mistreated—the world was not worthy of them.”



Of course, there are times to “wait on the Lord”, but that’s different from just playing it safe, clinging to the illusion of safety, refusing to follow Jesus out of a fear of risk. Sometimes it means persevering. Sometimes it means sacrificing our own plans. Always it means trusting that “… we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose.” (Rom. 8:28)

Which do you choose? Fantasy or the future? Perceived safety or risking in faith?

p5rn7vb


Randy CraneRandy Crane is passionate about helping Christians, especially those with a Disney affinity, to discover and connect to their GOD-GIVEN PURPOSE AND VALUE, to build their lives to achieve TRUE SUCCESS AND MEANING, and to POSITIVELY IMPACT their world. For more than two decades, Randy has been leading individuals and teams into a greater joy and child-like appreciation of the world around them, equipping them to reach beyond what they have previously experienced and build a God-given identity and purpose. Ready to experience that for yourself? Tell us where to send SIX free videos all created to help answer the 3 questions you need to experience PEACE, FREEDOM, and PURPOSE!

* indicates required
Email Format